• Slackware 15.0

    From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to All on Sun Sep 13 21:27:00 2020
    Hello all,

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to. Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years
    now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.



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  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Dan Clough on Sun Sep 13 22:33:21 2020
    On 13 Sep 20 21:27:00, Dan Clough said the following to All:

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
    * Origin: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators? (1:229/426)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757.2 to Dan Clough on Sun Sep 13 21:37:08 2020
    Anybody else use Slackware...?

    Yes, I use slackware on a couple of boxes and a laptop.

    Are you as tired as I am of waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    It has been a long cycle. I'm not sure what is on Pat's todo list for 15.0 so I'm not sure when a release will be ready. I've been watching the what's new for current but I don't see any news of an RC1 or anything like that.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to.

    Same here. I'm not against moving to something else but I'm quite comfortable with what I have.

    Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.

    I agree. There are a number of updates that need (well, not really) getting to but 14.2 doesn't have the libs needed so it'll have to wait.

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  • From Richard Falken@1:123/115 to Dan Clough on Mon Sep 14 03:12:04 2020
    Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Dan Clough to All on Sun Sep 13 2020 09:27 pm

    Hello all,

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to. Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years
    now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.



    ... Enter any 12 digit prime number to continue.

    Hi there.

    Yes I am using Slackware both at home and work.

    I am holding on upgrading any computer as long as I can, but sometimes I find I need some new feature. Since I don't feel like running -current I am being forced to migrate the machines to something else.

    I think part of the Problem is Patrick has not figured out a way to monetize a new release sonce the Slackware Store stabbed him in the back, and is holding until he can come up with something. But that is only speculation from my part.

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  • From Richard Falken@1:123/115 to Nick Andre on Mon Sep 14 03:14:08 2020
    Re: Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Nick Andre to Dan Clough on Sun Sep 13 2020 10:33 pm

    On 13 Sep 20 21:27:00, Dan Clough said the following to All:

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    Nick

    There are more Linux distributions that don't carry systemd besides Slackware.

    Devuan and Gentoo are the two big ones that come to mind, but there are also small ones (such as Tiny Core Linux). Knoppix has SystemD but does not use it as an init system. Knopper is very vocal about SystemD messing up his tidy distro :-P

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  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Dan Clough on Mon Sep 14 08:46:02 2020
    Hello Dan!

    13 Sep 2020 21:27, Dan Clough wrote to All:

    Hello all,

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to. Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years
    now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.

    i use slackware at home, but not on my servers since it miss portage from gentoo

    using slackware64 currennt, i admit it will be precompiled problems


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Nick Andre on Mon Sep 14 08:48:38 2020
    Hello Nick!

    13 Sep 2020 22:33, Nick Andre wrote to Dan Clough:

    On 13 Sep 20 21:27:00, Dan Clough said the following to All:

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    gentoo have it default disabled in kernel, but if users or even admins want the trouble it can be enabled, is slackware the one that miss portage from gentoo ?


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Nick Andre on Mon Sep 14 07:27:00 2020
    Nick Andre wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    That is correct, it is one of the few. Another that I know of is
    "MX Linux" which is quite nice, and a fork of Debian called
    "Devuan", which I have heard mixed reviews about.



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  • From Richard Falken@1:123/115 to Dan Clough on Mon Sep 14 10:31:40 2020
    Re: Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Dan Clough to Nick Andre on Mon Sep 14 2020 07:27 am

    Nick Andre wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    That is correct, it is one of the few. Another that I know of is
    "MX Linux" which is quite nice, and a fork of Debian called
    "Devuan", which I have heard mixed reviews about.



    ... Gone crazy, be back later, please leave message.

    I think MX linux has ystemD, but you make me doubt.

    Devuan is quite ok. It is what I use when I need a Debian-like environment, which is not very often. Still I prefer Slackware. I have been booting some OpenBSD systems as of late though.

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  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Richard Falken on Mon Sep 14 11:52:36 2020
    On 14 Sep 20 03:14:08, Richard Falken said the following to Nick Andre:

    There are more Linux distributions that don't carry systemd besides Slackwa

    Devuan and Gentoo are the two big ones that come to mind, but there are als small ones (such as Tiny Core Linux). Knoppix has SystemD but does not use as an init system. Knopper is very vocal about SystemD messing up his tidy distro :-P

    I only work with Linux / BSD systems occasionally. I was curious because the last time I worked with Slackware it was pretty "clean" as it was; guys I knew used to complain loudly about the many wonderful problems of systemd.

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
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  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Benny Pedersen on Mon Sep 14 11:54:46 2020
    On 14 Sep 20 08:48:38, Benny Pedersen said the following to Nick Andre:

    gentoo have it default disabled in kernel, but if users or even admins want the trouble it can be enabled, is slackware the one that miss portage from gentoo ?

    I messed around with Gentoo only once, about like 15 years ago. Seemed like
    it was really meant for sadomasochists 8-)

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
    * Origin: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators? (1:229/426)
  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Richard Falken on Mon Sep 14 21:53:00 2020
    Richard Falken wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    That is correct, it is one of the few. Another that I know of is
    "MX Linux" which is quite nice, and a fork of Debian called
    "Devuan", which I have heard mixed reviews about.

    I think MX linux has ystemD, but you make me doubt.

    Nope, it definitely doesn't. I've got it running on the wife's
    laptop. You can see the details here: (scroll down a bit to the
    "init software" line):

    https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=mx

    Devuan is quite ok. It is what I use when I need a Debian-like environment, which is not very often. Still I prefer Slackware. I
    have been booting some OpenBSD systems as of late though.

    I may give it (Devuan) another look one of these days. I do like
    Debian and it's offspring fairly well. Never cared much for the
    BSD's, although only ever tried the FreeBSD variant and that was
    long ago. Never really saw the point of it - what does it do any
    better than Linux...?



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  • From John McCoy@1:249/400 to Nick Andre on Tue Sep 15 01:50:30 2020
    On 14 Sep 2020, Nick Andre said the following...

    guys I knew used to complain loudly about the many wonderful problems of systemd.

    Shoehorning everything plus the kitchen sink, which is itself full of other, smaller kitchen sinks in various states of disrepair, into the one process
    that is basically God on the system? What could possibly go wrong?

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A46 2020/08/26 (Linux/64)
    * Origin: Subcarrier BBS (1:249/400)
  • From Richard Falken@1:123/115 to Dan Clough on Tue Sep 15 07:12:57 2020
    Re: Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Dan Clough to Richard Falken on Mon Sep 14 2020 09:53 pm

    I may give it (Devuan) another look one of these days. I do like
    Debian and it's offspring fairly well. Never cared much for the
    BSD's, although only ever tried the FreeBSD variant and that was
    long ago. Never really saw the point of it - what does it do any
    better than Linux...?

    FreeBSD used to have proper jails and great ZFS integration, but I don't know how
    great of an advantage it has on those fields these days.

    What OpenBSD does is to feel less insane than the others. To begin with, it has less
    cruft going on. If you don'tknow how something works, it is easier to figure it out
    form the source code than it is from the source code of some of the alternatives. Not
    that you are likely to need it since everything is well documented.

    Traditionally risky daemons are chrooted and subject to privilege deprivation. BSD
    Auth is easier to understand and work with than something like PAM. The TCP stack you
    would have to harden after every Linux install is set with sane defaults in OpenBSD.

    Also, it comes with software enough to build your own packaging compiling cluster. The
    port system is so fun to break havoc with :-)

    Cherry on the top: the OpenBSD comunity has a reputation of being composed of unfriendly bastards. I think that reputation is overblown, but they really have an
    Iron Fist of Death when dealing with drama. Anybody strong enough to remain active in
    the community is granted to really care for the OS - ie. if you pop up in the IRC
    channel you are likely to find people who LIVES OpenBSD, as opposed to self-entitled
    brats you often find in some forums.

    Oh, and OpenBSD has PF. Some people prefers it over Linux packet filtering interfaces.
    It is a matter of taste, really. Same with the default smtp daemon or httpd. Those are
    a delight to work with and are so much logical and preasurable to configure than the
    minastream ones you'd find in the Linux world.

    IMO you could do what you do with an OpenBSD with a Linux, but when deploying some
    paket forwarder or small server, or a small web service, OpenBSD gives you less post-instll work to do and the whole thing seems more logical in general. I mean, the
    Filesystem Hierarchy the Linux world routinely rapes.... you suggest putting the wrong
    file in the worng place in the OpenBSD world and they will send Skynet for you.

    That said, OpenBSD has its own bunch of problems, like lacking proper cow for the
    filesystem. They also lack a MAC framework - they have other ways to mitigate break-ins, exploits, and what a program may access, but you won't find SElinux or AppArmor capabilities at kernel level.

    I think that pretty much sums it up.


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  • From Dan Clough@1:123/115 to Richard Falken on Tue Sep 15 07:35:00 2020
    Richard Falken wrote to Dan Clough <=-

    I may give it (Devuan) another look one of these days. I do like
    Debian and it's offspring fairly well. Never cared much for the
    BSD's, although only ever tried the FreeBSD variant and that was
    long ago. Never really saw the point of it - what does it do any
    better than Linux...?

    FreeBSD used to have proper jails and great ZFS integration, but
    I don't know how great of an advantage it has on those fields
    these days.

    What OpenBSD does is to feel less insane than the others. To
    begin with, it has less cruft going on. If you don'tknow how
    something works, it is easier to figure it out form the source
    code than it is from the source code of some of the alternatives.
    Not that you are likely to need it since everything is well
    documented.

    Traditionally risky daemons are chrooted and subject to privilege deprivation. BSD Auth is easier to understand and work with than
    something like PAM. The TCP stack you would have to harden after
    every Linux install is set with sane defaults in OpenBSD.

    Also, it comes with software enough to build your own packaging
    compiling cluster. The port system is so fun to break havoc with
    :-)

    Cherry on the top: the OpenBSD comunity has a reputation of being
    composed of unfriendly bastards. I think that reputation is
    overblown, but they really have an Iron Fist of Death when
    dealing with drama. Anybody strong enough to remain active in the community is granted to really care for the OS - ie. if you pop
    up in the IRC channel you are likely to find people who LIVES
    OpenBSD, as opposed to self-entitled brats you often find in some
    forums.

    Oh, and OpenBSD has PF. Some people prefers it over Linux packet
    filtering interfaces. It is a matter of taste, really. Same with
    the default smtp daemon or httpd. Those are a delight to work
    with and are so much logical and preasurable to configure than
    the minastream ones you'd find in the Linux world.

    IMO you could do what you do with an OpenBSD with a Linux, but
    when deploying some paket forwarder or small server, or a small
    web service, OpenBSD gives you less post-instll work to do and
    the whole thing seems more logical in general. I mean, the
    Filesystem Hierarchy the Linux world routinely rapes.... you
    suggest putting the wrong file in the worng place in the OpenBSD
    world and they will send Skynet for you.

    That said, OpenBSD has its own bunch of problems, like lacking
    proper cow for the filesystem. They also lack a MAC framework -
    they have other ways to mitigate break-ins, exploits, and what a
    program may access, but you won't find SElinux or AppArmor
    capabilities at kernel level.

    I think that pretty much sums it up.

    Thanks for that info, good insight there. It (OpenBSD) interests
    me some, but frankly, I don't have the time nor motivation to go
    through the learning curve for something that does pretty much
    what I already know how to do... That was kinda my point - if I
    was a Windoze guy looking to move to the *nix world, perhaps it
    would make good sense. But as an experienced Linux guy, well....
    not so much. Appreciate you taking the time to write that up!



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  • From mark lewis@1:3634/12 to John McCoy on Tue Sep 15 10:03:35 2020
    Re: Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: John McCoy to Nick Andre on Tue Sep 15 2020 01:50:30


    Shoehorning everything plus the kitchen sink, which is itself full
    of other, smaller kitchen sinks in various states of disrepair,
    into the one process that is basically God on the system? What
    could possibly go wrong?

    /me bets most any enlightened winwhatever user can answer that question ;)


    )\/(ark
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  • From Gerrit Kuehn@2:240/12 to Richard Falken on Tue Sep 15 15:47:54 2020
    Hello Richard!

    15 Sep 20 07:12, Richard Falken wrote to Dan Clough:

    FreeBSD used to have proper jails and great ZFS integration, but I
    don't know how great of an advantage it has on those fields these days.

    It still has proper jails and great ZFS integration. The latter will share the codebase with the Linux variant starting the next release, I think (after other players like OpenSolaris & co. dropped out). Apart from storage, networking has always been one of the things FreeBSD excels at.

    Oh, and OpenBSD has PF. Some people prefers it over Linux packet filtering interfaces.

    It's certainly a better choice from my point of view. It comes with FreeBSD, too (although a previous version), as one of the three or so built-in packet filters to choose from.


    Regards,
    Gerrit

    ... 3:47PM up 240 days, 5:44, 7 users, load averages: 0.22, 0.45, 0.47

    --- Msged/BSD 6.1.2
    * Origin: Dry thoughts for the tenant (2:240/12)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Nick Andre on Tue Sep 15 20:35:26 2020
    Hello Nick!

    14 Sep 2020 11:54, Nick Andre wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    gentoo have it default disabled in kernel, but if users or even admins
    want the trouble it can be enabled, is slackware the one that miss
    portage from gentoo ?

    I messed around with Gentoo only once, about like 15 years ago.

    why leave it then ?

    Seemed like it was really meant for sadomasochists 8-)

    new word for me

    i think time have changed lots since


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Benny Pedersen on Tue Sep 15 19:27:08 2020
    On 15 Sep 20 20:35:26, Benny Pedersen said the following to Nick Andre:

    I messed around with Gentoo only once, about like 15 years ago.

    why leave it then ?

    I prefer to have my computers work for me and not the other way around.

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
    * Origin: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators? (1:229/426)
  • From Kai Richter@2:240/77 to Dan Clough on Wed Sep 16 01:32:34 2020
    Hello Dan!

    14 Sep 20, Dan Clough wrote to Nick Andre:

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    That is correct, it is one of the few.

    No, it's not, it does have systemd: https://github.com/Dlackware/systemd

    systemd for Slackware. These slackbuilds are provided to compile systemd on top of Stock Slackware

    Regards

    Kai

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.4.7
    * Origin: Monobox (2:240/77)
  • From Andrew Leary@1:320/219 to Kai Richter on Wed Sep 16 01:45:27 2020
    Hello Kai!

    16 Sep 20 01:32, you wrote to Dan Clough:

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    That is correct, it is one of the few.

    No, it's not, it does have systemd:
    https://github.com/Dlackware/systemd

    systemd for Slackware. These slackbuilds are provided to compile
    systemd on top of Stock Slackware

    A default installation of Slackware does not use systemd.

    Andrew

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Phoenix BBS * phoenix.bnbbbs.net (1:320/219)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Nick Andre on Wed Sep 16 13:25:10 2020
    Hello Nick!

    15 Sep 2020 19:27, Nick Andre wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    I prefer to have my computers work for me and not the other way
    around.

    self made is not good ?, i just try keep away from precompiled problems :)


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Kai Richter@2:240/77 to Andrew Leary on Wed Sep 16 11:28:16 2020
    Hello Andrew!

    16 Sep 20, Andrew Leary wrote to Kai Richter:

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?

    That is correct, it is one of the few.

    No, it's not, it does have systemd:
    https://github.com/Dlackware/systemd

    A default installation of Slackware does not use systemd.

    True but that was not the question.

    Some people think having a gun is far better than using it.

    Regards

    Kai

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.4.7
    * Origin: Monobox (2:240/77)
  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Benny Pedersen on Wed Sep 16 12:05:00 2020
    On 16 Sep 20 13:25:10, Benny Pedersen said the following to Nick Andre:

    I prefer to have my computers work for me and not the other way around.

    self made is not good ?, i just try keep away from precompiled problems :)

    But thats the thing. *Everything* on Gentoo had to be compiled. Forget about a Gentoo machine you can slap together in an hour or so to listen to music on, watch movies, gaming, porn, etc. You spend more time screwing around with compilers and all that just to have that feeling that its customized just for you... Sorry, its just not something that floats my boat.

    The end result of that custom Gentoo Linux box was really no different than if I threw in a live-CD install of Xubuntu or Mint or something. With those distros it mostly "worked" but given the nature of Linux, no offense to anyone reading this, theres always fucking *something* that just doesn't work out of the box like it does on Windows. As an example, I'm not replacing a video
    card just because Linux can't make it work. Money doesn't grow on trees.

    I know you're just being a silly Russian but if you don't like precompiled stuff, that must logically mean you study *all* the source code that you compile. Because... how do you know theres not some backdoor or vulnerability? Have you personally combed through the entire Linux kernal source?

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
    * Origin: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators? (1:229/426)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Kai Richter on Wed Sep 16 20:41:40 2020
    Hello Kai!

    16 Sep 2020 11:28, Kai Richter wrote to Andrew Leary:

    A default installation of Slackware does not use systemd.
    True but that was not the question.

    +1

    Some people think having a gun is far better than using it.

    in the us its fire before asking hows the weater will be tomorrow

    windows precompile kernels is lots more secure then linux, show me the source Nick Andre :)


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Richard Falken to Nick Andre on Wed Sep 16 14:07:59 2020
    Re: Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Nick Andre to Benny Pedersen on Wed Sep 16 2020 12:05 pm

    I know you're just being a silly Russian but if you don't like precompiled stuff, that must logically mean you study *all* the source code that you compile. Because... how do you know theres not some backdoor or vulnerabilit Have you personally combed through the entire Linux kernal source?

    Liking ports systems does not mean you study the whole source code.

    I have some ports systems that allow me to create packages that feature my own patches. It is convenient. BUt it does not mean I have to go through all the source code in the ports tree to enjoy the advantages of a port system.

    Also, using ports systems does not mean you are a tin-foil hat wearer.
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Richard Falken on Thu Sep 17 06:02:44 2020
    Hello Richard!

    16 Sep 2020 14:07, Richard Falken wrote to Nick Andre:

    Liking ports systems does not mean you study the whole source code.

    are debian / ubuntu / centos / redhat variants even do this ?

    I have some ports systems that allow me to create packages that
    feature my own patches. It is convenient. BUt it does not mean I have to go through
    all the source code in the ports tree to enjoy the advantages of a port system.

    i find it funny that Nick thinks kernel source in gentoo have more secureity holes then any precompiled systems like slackware

    Also, using ports systems does not mean you are a tin-foil hat wearer.

    all just need portage


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Alexey Vissarionov@2:5020/545 to Kai Richter on Thu Sep 17 11:22:44 2020
    Good ${greeting_time}, Kai!

    16 Sep 2020 01:32:34, you wrote to Dan Clough:

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?
    That is correct, it is one of the few.
    No, it's not, it does have systemd:
    https://github.com/Dlackware/systemd systemd for Slackware.
    These slackbuilds are provided to compile systemd on top of
    Stock Slackware

    Are there some significant number of idiots who will do that for any other reason than having fun and saying "yes, it builds"?


    --
    Alexey V. Vissarionov aka Gremlin from Kremlin
    gremlin.ru!gremlin; +vii-cmiii-ccxxix-lxxix-xlii

    ... that's why I really dislike fools.
    --- /bin/vi
    * Origin: http://openwall.com/Owl (2:5020/545)
  • From John McCoy@1:249/400 to Nick Andre on Thu Sep 17 04:16:27 2020
    On 16 Sep 2020, Nick Andre said the following...
    But thats the thing. *Everything* on Gentoo had to be compiled.

    There are binary repositories, but in order to ensure compatibility you'd
    need to build compiled packages with all standard settings anyway.

    With those distros it mostly "worked" but given the nature of Linux, no offense to anyone reading this, theres always fucking *something* that just doesn't work out of the box like it does on Windows. As an example, I'm not replacing a video card just because Linux can't make it work.

    Yeah I wouldn't bother trying to install it if I didn't know beforehand that the hardware was compatible.
    Incompatibility is often a case of trade secrecy or lack of support which the driver developers can't do much about. Famously video cards, wifi and the
    old "winmodem" software modems. If the manufacturer won't provide a driver
    and refuses to even tell you how the hardware works so you can write your
    own, then you don't get to have a driver.

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A46 2020/08/26 (Linux/64)
    * Origin: Subcarrier BBS (1:249/400)
  • From Gerrit Kuehn@2:240/12 to Benny Pedersen on Thu Sep 17 10:44:24 2020
    Hello Benny!

    17 Sep 20 06:02, Benny Pedersen wrote to Richard Falken:


    i find it funny that Nick thinks kernel source in gentoo have more secureity holes then any precompiled systems like slackware

    Even more entertaining than his localisation of Russia?


    Regards,
    Gerrit

    ... 10:44AM up 242 days, 41 mins, 7 users, load averages: 0.96, 0.56, 0.46

    --- Msged/BSD 6.1.2
    * Origin: We are a nation (2:240/12)
  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Benny Pedersen on Thu Sep 17 06:41:13 2020
    On 17 Sep 20 06:02:44, Benny Pedersen said the following to Richard Falken:

    i find it funny that Nick thinks kernel source in gentoo have more secureit holes then any precompiled systems like slackware

    Thats not what I said, but continue the laughs.

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
    * Origin: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators? (1:229/426)
  • From Kai Richter@2:240/77 to Alexey Vissarionov on Thu Sep 17 16:12:50 2020
    Hello Alexey!

    17 Sep 20, Alexey Vissarionov wrote to Kai Richter:

    Is Slackware the one that doesn't have systemd?
    That is correct, it is one of the few.
    No, it's not, it does have systemd:
    https://github.com/Dlackware/systemd systemd for Slackware.

    Are there some significant number of idiots who will do that for any
    other reason than having fun and saying "yes, it builds"?

    I think that counter is exactly zero. But not because what you may think of. Anybody who is able to set up a systemd based slackware on his own have skills far above an idiots level. My pre-justice tells me if they can't be idiots then they must have good reasons to use it. But the most important point is: Who cares?

    The question was does slackware *have* systemd - not does it *use* systemd.

    I just wanted to highlight that slackware isn't restricted by missing systemd. Use it or not, that's still your freedom.

    Regards

    Kai

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.4.7
    * Origin: Monobox (2:240/77)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Gerrit Kuehn on Thu Sep 17 18:31:26 2020
    Hello Gerrit!

    17 Sep 2020 10:44, Gerrit Kuehn wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    i find it funny that Nick thinks kernel source in gentoo have more
    secureity holes then any precompiled systems like slackware

    Even more entertaining than his localisation of Russia?

    i have never being there, sadly nice russin womens have the own life on vk.com, russian padant to tictok hehe


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Nick Andre on Thu Sep 17 18:33:28 2020
    Hello Nick!

    17 Sep 2020 06:41, Nick Andre wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    i find it funny that Nick thinks kernel source in gentoo have more
    secureit holes then any precompiled systems like slackware

    Thats not what I said, but continue the laughs.

    fair, i have no more ritter sport left :)


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.9-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Nick Andre@1:229/426 to Benny Pedersen on Thu Sep 17 16:00:13 2020
    On 17 Sep 20 18:33:28, Benny Pedersen said the following to Nick Andre:

    Thats not what I said, but continue the laughs.

    fair, i have no more ritter sport left :)

    The next one will cost you vodka... the good shit please.

    Nick

    --- Renegade vY2Ka2
    * Origin: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators? (1:229/426)
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Benny Pedersen on Thu Sep 17 22:09:12 2020
    Hallo Benny!

    i have never being there, sadly nice russin womens have the own
    life on vk.com, russian padant to tictok hehe

    Светлана хочет меня.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 5.0.18(1)-release (x86_64-heatsink-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/38.1 to Maurice Kinal on Fri Sep 25 01:14:34 2020
    Hello, Maurice Kinal.
    On 17/09/2020 22.09 you wrote:

    i have never being there, sadly nice russin womens have the own
    life on vk.com, russian padant to tictok hehe
    Светлана хочет меня.
    What ever?

    --
    Best regards!
    Posted using Hotdoged on Android
    --- Hotdoged/2.13.5/Android
    * Origin: Android device, Milky Way (2:230/38.1)
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Benny Pedersen on Fri Sep 25 01:50:22 2020
    Hallo Benny!

    Светлана хочет меня.

    What ever?

    Tell that to Svetlana and see where that gets you.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 5.0.18(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Maurice Kinal on Wed Sep 30 10:55:08 2020
    Hello Maurice!

    25 Sep 2020 01:50, Maurice Kinal wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    ≡╠≡#≡┴╨Θ≡+≡#≡ó≡# ╨α≡«╨τ≡┴╨Θ ≡+≡┴≡ó╨┼.

    What ever?

    Tell that to Svetlana and see where that gets you.

    latin 1 is all we need on fidonet


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.12-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001.2989 to Benny Pedersen on Wed Sep 30 05:49:55 2020
    Hey Benny!

    latin 1 is all we need on fidonet

    Which latin 1? ... and once you decide on the correct encoding best of luck getting everyone, especially Svetlana, to agree that it is so.

    I am sticking with utf-8. It is the only way to proceed.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Betere byþ oft feðre þonne oferfeðre.
    Better to be often loaded than overloaded.
    --- GNU bash, version 5.0.18(1)-release (x86_64-motorshed-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Pointy Stick - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001.2989)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Maurice Kinal on Thu Oct 1 11:15:32 2020
    Hello Maurice!

    30 Sep 2020 05:49, Maurice Kinal wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    latin 1 is all we need on fidonet

    Which latin 1?

    i think SPOT on amiga is well designed to know why LATIN-1 is well choiced to map all kinds of other solotions into something that works, if you dont know LATIN-1 in fidonet software you still have to learn more....

    ... and once you decide on the correct encoding best of
    luck getting everyone, especially Svetlana, to agree that it is so.

    lets change keymaps to be fully 32bit first, so fucking another solutions on the same problem is created, we could all aswell just use HTML

    blame 8-bit

    I am sticking with utf-8. It is the only way to proceed.

    no


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.12-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Benny Pedersen on Thu Oct 1 16:35:25 2020
    Hallo Benny!

    i think SPOT on amiga is well designed to know why LATIN-1 is
    well choiced

    So which one does amiga say LATIN-1 is? ISO-8859-1, CP1250 or CP1252?

    blame 8-bit

    Nope. It was never 8-bit that corrupted proper aliases for 8-bit character sets.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 5.0.18(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Maurice Kinal on Fri Oct 2 08:19:04 2020
    Hello Maurice!

    01 Oct 2020 16:35, Maurice Kinal wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    i think SPOT on amiga is well designed to know why LATIN-1 is
    well choiced

    So which one does amiga say LATIN-1 is? ISO-8859-1, CP1250 or CP1252?

    if a lotto copond only have this options, it would be more winners

    blame 8-bit

    Nope. It was never 8-bit that corrupted proper aliases for 8-bit character sets.

    if computers was 32bit from the beginning, keyboard charset would have being solved from the start, we today are limited to 7 bit with multiple problems to solve, HTML works since it can be safely parsed as JSON

    oh never mind got a new kernel....


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.13-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Benny Pedersen on Sat Oct 3 00:41:47 2020
    Hallo Benny!

    we today are limited to 7 bit with multiple problems to solve

    Speak for yourself. This was never an issue that I was ever aware of. What was an issue way back when, is silly fidonet sysops who got suckered into thinking that CP437 is higher/upper ascii. There never was any 8 bit characters in ascii and I doubt there ever will be.

    oh never mind got a new kernel....

    kv-5.8.13 has serious usb issues. As of today my "stable" boot is using kv-5.4.69. No penguins with intel graphics but everything else seems to be working including i915drmfb.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 5.0.18(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)
  • From Rob Swindell to Benny Pedersen on Fri Oct 2 19:13:46 2020
    Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Benny Pedersen to Maurice Kinal on Fri Oct 02 2020 08:19 am

    if computers was 32bit from the beginning, keyboard charset would have being solved from the start, we today are limited to 7 bit with multiple problems to solve, HTML works since it can be safely parsed as JSON

    This is a joke, right?

    digital man

    Synchronet/BBS Terminology Definition #67:
    SIGHUP = Hangup signal sent to a process when its controlling terminal is closed
    Norco, CA WX: 83.9°F, 28.0% humidity, 7 mph ENE wind, 0.00 inches rain/24hrs
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Maurice Kinal on Sun Oct 4 21:32:52 2020
    Hello Maurice!

    03 Oct 2020 00:41, Maurice Kinal wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    we today are limited to 7 bit with multiple problems to solve
    Speak for yourself.

    if 8 bit was supported we would not need uuencode or even base64

    This was never an issue that I was ever aware of.

    maybe i am just older amiga user ?

    What was an issue way back when, is silly fidonet sysops who got suckered into thinking that CP437 is higher/upper ascii.

    it could be classified as fake news, if we ask Donald Trump :)

    There never
    was any 8 bit characters in ascii and I doubt there ever will be.

    100% agree

    unicode is just shit like all the other encoding standards, if we would have progressed well it would have being using html in more places, do you know svg image format ?, totaly 7 bit file for binarie content, and nearly all browsers in 2020 support it

    oh never mind got a new kernel....
    kv-5.8.13 has serious usb issues.

    fair, but i have no usage for usb on linode.com :)

    As of today my "stable" boot is
    using kv-5.4.69.

    okay

    No penguins with intel graphics but everything else
    seems to be working including i915drmfb.

    maybe just tweek on kernel boot options could solve it if kernel default options is not good ?


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.13-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Rob Swindell on Sun Oct 4 21:42:18 2020
    Hello Rob!

    02 Oct 2020 19:13, Rob Swindell wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    if computers was 32bit from the beginning, keyboard charset would have
    being solved from the start, we today are limited to 7 bit with multiple
    problems to solve, HTML works since it can be safely parsed as JSON

    This is a joke, right?

    it would be a very slow computer if databits was changed from 8 bit to 32 bit, but keymaps then would not need 7 bit maps or encoding to support 5000+ charters in chinees

    its to late to change it now, and this is why we see so many solotions on the same problem that does not exists in html


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.13-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Rob Swindell to Benny Pedersen on Sun Oct 4 15:21:10 2020
    Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Benny Pedersen to Rob Swindell on Sun Oct 04 2020 09:42 pm

    Hello Rob!

    02 Oct 2020 19:13, Rob Swindell wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    if computers was 32bit from the beginning, keyboard charset would have
    being solved from the start, we today are limited to 7 bit with multiple
    problems to solve, HTML works since it can be safely parsed as JSON

    This is a joke, right?

    it would be a very slow computer if databits was changed from 8 bit to 32 bit, but keymaps then would not need 7 bit maps or encoding to support 5000+ charters in chinees

    its to late to change it now, and this is why we see so many solotions on the same problem that does not exists in html

    Wow. Those statements are so all over the place, I don't even know where to begin. But I guess I'll start with: HTML is not a character encoding scheme, it's a markup language. HTML does include a character (entity) encoding scheme, but HTML entity encodings are not represented as a sequence of "bits", but rather as a sequence of characters and those charaters are usually encoded in, you guessed it, UTF-8.

    digital man

    Sling Blade quote #9:
    Doyle Hargraves: Morris here is a modern-day poet, kinda like in olden times. Norco, CA WX: 95.7°F, 17.0% humidity, 9 mph ENE wind, 0.00 inches rain/24hrs
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Benny Pedersen on Mon Oct 5 04:29:41 2020
    Hallo Benny!

    maybe i am just older amiga user ?

    I don't see what difference it makes. 7-bit ascii characters should be the same no matter what OS and/or hardware is being used. As for 8-bit characters probably CP1252 would be the most compatible these days but if amiga figures ISO-8859-1 is the default then that should work although you'll see the occasional C1 control codes every now and then originating from a so-called "LATIN-1" systems where CP1252 is the default character set.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 5.0.18(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Rob Swindell on Mon Oct 5 13:48:38 2020
    Hello Rob!

    04 Oct 2020 15:21, Rob Swindell wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    Wow.

    html does not need unicode, bummer

    Those statements are so all over the place, I don't even know
    where to begin.

    then stop ?

    But I guess I'll start with: HTML is not a character
    encoding scheme,

    to me it does not matter if it is or not

    it's a markup language. HTML does include a character
    (entity) encoding scheme, but HTML entity encodings are not
    represented as a sequence of "bits",

    bits, hmm :)

    but rather as a sequence of
    characters and those charaters are usually encoded in, you guessed it, UTF-8.

    no, definaly no


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.13-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Kai Richter@2:240/77 to Benny Pedersen on Mon Oct 5 17:03:02 2020
    Hello Benny!

    04 Oct 20, Benny Pedersen wrote to Rob Swindell:

    its to late to change it now, and this is why we see so many solotions
    on the same problem that does not exists in html

    Guys, what kind of problem are you talking about??

    If you code all humans writing symbols to HTML you will have the same situation like now. HTML will need multiple bytes to define a symbol. No matter if the HTML charset will be limited to 7 bit or not, the software must know which symbol have to be displayed for that multibyte sequence.

    Regards

    Kai

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.4.7
    * Origin: Monobox (2:240/77)
  • From Benny Pedersen@2:230/0 to Kai Richter on Tue Oct 6 14:07:30 2020
    Hello Kai!

    05 Oct 2020 17:03, Kai Richter wrote to Benny Pedersen:

    Guys, what kind of problem are you talking about??

    none

    if its all 7 bit there is just diffrent parsing of 7 bit

    If you code all humans writing symbols to HTML you will have the same situation like now.

    so you know json ?

    HTML will need multiple bytes to define a symbol.

    same as unicode when its 8 bit charters

    No matter if the HTML charset will be limited to 7 bit or not,

    ?, i have seen UTF-8 and QP combined badly in lots of emails where programmers dont understand double encodeing problems, QP hide 8 bit chatters, so UTF-8 dont know it needs to be unicode encoded, thats not how it should be, since the reader does not know if sender send from what charset :/

    the software must know which symbol have to be displayed for that multibyte sequence.

    and unicode solve that much better then html, hmm


    Regards Benny

    ... there can only be one way of life, and it works :)

    --- Msged/LNX 6.1.2 (Linux/5.8.13-gentoo-x86_64 (x86_64))
    * Origin: I will always keep a PC running CPM 3.0 (2:230/0)
  • From Kai Richter@2:240/77 to Benny Pedersen on Tue Oct 6 23:09:12 2020
    Hello Benny!

    06 Oct 20, Benny Pedersen wrote to Kai Richter:

    HTML will need multiple bytes to define a symbol.

    same as unicode when its 8 bit charters

    You got the point. You will have multibytes in unicode and multibytes plus html<tags> around it.

    programmers dont understand double encodeing problems

    You can't blame a standard for that. There will be programmers that don't understand html too.

    the software must know which symbol have to be displayed for that
    multibyte sequence.

    and unicode solve that much better then html, hmm

    I never said that. You must have the multibyte sequence to define the symbol. Why adding memory space and cpu requiring htmltags around it? I don't see the advantage.

    Regards

    Kai

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.4.7
    * Origin: Monobox (2:240/77)
  • From Andrew Alt@1:261/38 to Dan Clough on Wed Oct 14 00:13:42 2020
    Dan Clough wrote to All <=-

    Hello all,

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to. Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years
    now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.

    Good question. The way I remember recent history is that Slackware used to have a
    release cycle/goal of every 6 months. Then Patrick and his wife had their first

    child.

    I don't know if that's the reason for the slow-down, but from what little I know
    of raising children, they can definitely gum up the works! ;)

    I switched to Debian a few years ago. I still love Slackware (it was my first distro) and peek at the current changelog once in a while though. I wish Patrick
    and his family the best.



    --
    -Andy


    ... Beep. Invalid Input. I take only cash.
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-5
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)
  • From Andrew Alt@1:261/38 to Rob Swindell on Wed Oct 14 00:13:42 2020
    Hey Rob...

    https://github.com/wmcbrine/MultiMail/pull/27

    I found your controversial comments suggesting that gitignore files are useful in
    git repos very insightful. ;)


    I left a comment on your PR that essentially supports your radical thinking.


    --
    -Andy


    ... MultiMail, the new multi-platform, multi-format offline reader!
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-5
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)
  • From Rob Swindell to Andrew Alt on Tue Oct 13 21:35:31 2020
    Re: dot gitignore
    By: Andrew Alt to Rob Swindell on Wed Oct 14 2020 12:13 am

    Hey Rob...

    https://github.com/wmcbrine/MultiMail/pull/27

    I found your controversial comments suggesting that gitignore files are useful in
    git repos very insightful. ;)


    I left a comment on your PR that essentially supports your radical thinking.

    /me chuckles at "radical thinking".

    It's not a big deal, I thought I was being helpful to others as well as the future me that clones this repo again, as I'm sure I will.

    I didn't agree with Mcbrine's comment on your (?) issue here https://github.com/wmcbrine/MultiMail/pull/21
    asserting that there's "no reason" for a .gitignore file in a repo. Of course there are reasons (and I gave him one) and his response was a dismissive "Good grief". Okay, that's fine. It's his repo and it's not a big a deal, but as he stated, it's a pet peeve of his that he apparently doesn't like talking about. Whatever. <shrug>

    digital man

    Synchronet/BBS Terminology Definition #37:
    HTTP = Hypertext Transfer Protocol
    Norco, CA WX: 79.6°F, 33.0% humidity, 0 mph SSW wind, 0.00 inches rain/24hrs
  • From Richard Falken@1:123/115 to Andrew Alt on Wed Oct 14 02:57:55 2020
    Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Andrew Alt to Dan Clough on Wed Oct 14 2020 12:13 am

    Dan Clough wrote to All <=-

    Hello all,

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to. Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years
    now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.

    Good question. The way I remember recent history is that Slackware used to h a
    release cycle/goal of every 6 months. Then Patrick and his wife had their fi

    child.

    I don't know if that's the reason for the slow-down, but from what little I know
    of raising children, they can definitely gum up the works! ;)

    I switched to Debian a few years ago. I still love Slackware (it was my firs distro) and peek at the current changelog once in a while though. I wish Patrick
    and his family the best.



    --
    -Andy


    ... Beep. Invalid Input. I take only cash.
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    I am also getting burnt by the wait.

    I don't mind using old software, but sometimes you need to use new software, and I am having to migrate some Slackwares to something else because Slackware 14.2 is getting too old.

    The problem is I know no other reliable Linux I'd like to run.

    I could probably install Void and establñish a weekly upgrade schedule for "frontline" programs (browsers, email clients) and a anual schedule for the core (glibcs, binutils, kernels), but thing is, when I booted the live installer for a test, I was greeted by a session manager error, which gives a very lame first impression.

    Also I don't like rolling releases for serious stuff.

    Devuan is quite ok. I am not a fan of apt distributions though. I guess it is the one I will end up installing where I cannot fit a BSD though.

    --
    gopher://gopher.operationalsecurity.es
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Linux
    * Origin: Palantir * palantirbbs.ddns.net * Pensacola, FL * (1:123/115)
  • From Andrew Alt@1:261/38 to Rob Swindell on Wed Oct 14 14:55:44 2020
    Rob Swindell wrote to Andrew Alt <=-

    I left a comment on your PR that essentially supports your radical thinking.

    /me chuckles at "radical thinking".

    It's not a big deal, I thought I was being helpful to others as well as the future me that clones this repo again, as I'm sure I will.

    I didn't agree with Mcbrine's comment on your (?) issue here https://github.com/wmcbrine/MultiMail/pull/21
    asserting that there's "no reason" for a .gitignore file in a repo. Of course there are reasons (and I gave him one) and his response was a dismissive "Good grief". Okay, that's fine. It's his repo and it's not
    a big a deal, but as he stated, it's a pet peeve of his that he
    apparently doesn't like talking about. Whatever. <shrug>

    digital man

    Yeah, there are tons of projects to work on. Not worth giving much thought when

    things like that happen. As you say, his project.

    But I was kind of amused (and puzzled) when I saw he locked that PR for comments
    after you left yours.

    I'm curious to see how he'll review the PR I left this morning.


    --
    -Andy


    ... MultiMail, the new multi-platform, multi-format offline reader!
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-5
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)
  • From Andrew Alt@1:261/38 to Richard Falken on Wed Oct 14 14:55:44 2020
    Richard Falken wrote to Andrew Alt <=-

    Re: Slackware 15.0
    By: Andrew Alt to Dan Clough on Wed Oct 14 2020 12:13 am

    Dan Clough wrote to All <=-

    Hello all,

    Anybody else use Slackware...? Are you as tired as I am of
    waiting for a new release? It's starting to get ridiculous.

    Yeah, I know I could switch to something else, but I don't want
    to. Just wish he'd hurry things up a bit, it's been over 4 years
    now. Arrrgggghhhhhh.

    Good question. The way I remember recent history is that Slackware used to h a
    release cycle/goal of every 6 months. Then Patrick and his wife had their fi

    child.

    I don't know if that's the reason for the slow-down, but from what little I know
    of raising children, they can definitely gum up the works! ;)

    I switched to Debian a few years ago. I still love Slackware (it was my firs distro) and peek at the current changelog once in a while though. I wish Patrick
    and his family the best.



    --
    -Andy


    ... Beep. Invalid Input. I take only cash.
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    I am also getting burnt by the wait.

    I don't mind using old software, but sometimes you need to use new software, and I am having to migrate some Slackwares to something else because Slackware 14.2 is getting too old.

    The problem is I know no other reliable Linux I'd like to run.

    I could probably install Void and establ─▒ish a weekly upgrade schedule for "frontline" programs (browsers, email clients) and a anual schedule for the core (glibcs, binutils, kernels), but thing is, when I booted
    the live installer for a test, I was greeted by a session manager
    error, which gives a very lame first impression.

    Also I don't like rolling releases for serious stuff.

    Devuan is quite ok. I am not a fan of apt distributions though. I guess
    it is the one I will end up installing where I cannot fit a BSD though.

    I get it. It's tough to find a distro I really like. I'm not sure what I'd do if
    Debian wasn't around.

    Probably freak out and panic. ;) I'd be found motionless with a note taped to me,
    "A panic occurred".

    --
    -Andy


    ... Gone crazy, be back later, please leave message.
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-5
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)
  • From Rob Swindell to Andrew Alt on Wed Oct 14 12:55:45 2020
    Re: dot gitignore
    By: Andrew Alt to Rob Swindell on Wed Oct 14 2020 02:55 pm

    Rob Swindell wrote to Andrew Alt <=-

    I left a comment on your PR that essentially supports your radical thinking.

    /me chuckles at "radical thinking".

    It's not a big deal, I thought I was being helpful to others as well as the future me that clones this repo again, as I'm sure I will.

    I didn't agree with Mcbrine's comment on your (?) issue here https://github.com/wmcbrine/MultiMail/pull/21
    asserting that there's "no reason" for a .gitignore file in a repo. Of course there are reasons (and I gave him one) and his response was a dismissive "Good grief". Okay, that's fine. It's his repo and it's not a big a deal, but as he stated, it's a pet peeve of his that he apparently doesn't like talking about. Whatever. <shrug>

    Yeah, there are tons of projects to work on. Not worth giving much thought when

    things like that happen. As you say, his project.

    But I was kind of amused (and puzzled) when I saw he locked that PR for comments
    after you left yours.

    I'm curious to see how he'll review the PR I left this morning.

    Hopefully doesn't trigger another peeve. :-)

    digital man

    This Is Spinal Tap quote #34:
    We'd love to stand around and chat, but we've gotta sit down in the lobby Norco, CA WX: 91.6°F, 25.0% humidity, 7 mph ESE wind, 0.00 inches rain/24hrs
  • From Andrew Alt@1:261/38 to Rob Swindell on Sun Oct 18 23:39:22 2020
    Rob Swindell wrote to Andrew Alt <=-

    Re: dot gitignore
    By: Andrew Alt to Rob Swindell on Wed Oct 14 2020 02:55 pm

    Rob Swindell wrote to Andrew Alt <=-

    I'm curious to see how he'll review the PR I left this morning.

    Hopefully doesn't trigger another peeve. :-)

    digital man

    Hi Rob,

    I had to edit it twice. My first rev was horrible. I really need to stop trying to
    code late at night! :) But I think every coder has been on that train before. ;)

    The PR fixes the install target and adds an uninstall target to the makefile. I

    haven't heard from him yet. I think it's a good PR but probably could be better.
    I'm not used to writing makefiles; my experience with automake and autoconf files.

    --
    -Andy


    ... Got my tie caught in the fax... Suddenly I was in L.A.
    -+- MultiMail/Linux v0.52

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-5
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)